1:00am and houston hasn't been destroyed...yet

| 2 Comments

just went outside the data center. the hurricane is still officially lame. i don't care what the stupid over-zealous news reporters say. if people have any sense (questionable), they'll realize this and when something really bad *does* eventually happen, no one will believe the news. they are absurd. yes, there's wind. yes, there's rain. yes, some places will have some wind damage, downed power lines, transformers blowing, etc. but this is nowhere near the disaster they predicted, nor the one they have continually tried to act like was going to happen, then maybe going to happen, then still might possibly happen, then they just gave up and started fabricating bogus stories that were laughable as the deployed reporters tried to act like the waves were crazy, the rain was horizontal, the wind was blowing them around, etc. it's completely pathetic.

in other news, we're about to go outside and record our own news story. i hope we make it back alive...

2 Comments

Actually, I disagree.
Houston *has* been destroyed.
Although not by wind and rain and flood water.

I'm thinking that the negative psychological effects of this entire event are going to be with us for a very long time.
- We have no gas. I'm marooned in my home. I am acutally afraid to use the gas I have right now because I don't know when there is going to be more.
- Elected officials are acting like a power outtage and some wind blown debris are justifiable reasons to keep people away from their own property. Huh? Yeah, *that's* logical....because none of us have ever had to deal with that kind of stuff before.
- I don't know when we can return to normal life. When can the kids go back to school? When can I go back to work?

I have a feeling that I am not the only one with these concerns. The collective insanity has done MUCH damage to this city. And I am not acting like there is a solution at this point, because there really isn't -anymore-. It is too late - no matter how we proceed at this point there are still the after-effects of this widespread hysteria to deal with.

::sigh::

it doesn't sound like you disagreed with me, other than maybe on semantics. basically you said that the gov't and media whipped folk up into a frenzy and then couldn't handle the sh!t-storm they created. in any crisis situation, there is going to be infrastructure failure. most economies can't afford to have 200% to 400% more infrastructure on hand than they normally need. people would consider it a waste of tax dollars and unnecessary price inflation to support so much unused infrastructure. but when a crisis occurs, you have way more people using services way beyond normal levels (e.g., cell phones, phones, gas, roads, water, non-perishable food items, etc.).

i also think the american public has a fairly short attention span, and in a few days when most of houston is completely back to normal, people won't have nearly the anger or concerns or feelings about what happened. only those who had something horrible happen that they can't forget about it day-to-day will continue to care. and of course, the gov't inquiries, which most people won't pay attention to until there will be a small amount of interest months from now when the report finally comes out. unless the media decides to jump on it and turn it into their big story. which will last until the next big story comes along, or it doesn't boost their ratings.

maybe i'm a bit jaded after watching report after report of news folk hopping around and acting like the 30mph gusts and minimal rainfall at kemah were about to destory the city. also, a glass door and window breaking in from 70mph winds isn't abnormal. and absolutely everyone in galveston had to stand in front of the one brick wall that fell down. maybe the american people clamor for horrific images and the media is just trying their best to give them what they want.

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